March 2014


The-Wind-Rises-Poster The Wind Rises (2013)
Director: Hayao Miyazaki
Starring: Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Emily Blunt, John Krasinski (English version)
Running Time: 2 hrs, 6 mins
Rated: PG-13


Review by Brother Reed

Oh, Miyazaki. You have given us so many wonderful films over the years. Spirited Away. Castle in the Sky. Princess Mononoke. You’ve been a champion of imaginative animation without creative limits. And now at the end of your career, you’ve given us The Wind Rises, a movie about the act of creation that, surprisingly and unfortunately, doesn’t seem very creative. The only thing limitless about this movie is how long it feels. READ FULL REVIEW

non-stop-poster Non-Stop (2014)
Director: Jaume Collet-Serra
Starring: Liam Neeson, Julianne Moore, Michelle Dockery
Running Time: 1 hr, 46 mins
Rated: PG-13


Review by Brother Reed

What about Non-Stop, though?

Non-Stop may have had the most effective advertising of any movie in recent memory. That Key and Peele tie-in sketch, for all its transparency, completely cemented the title of the movie in my consciousness. Now I haven’t actually loved any of these Liam Neeson tough guy movies, though I thought Taken was alright. Unknown and A-Team were completely forgettable. Still, there isn’t a lot of competition right now so I went out to see the conspicuously hyphenated Non-Stop, featuring the incomparable Liam Neesons. READ FULL REVIEW

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I love movies about music.

I’ll give you a moment here to process the shock.

Virtually anyone who knows me could have likely predicted that I would say this, since music is such a big part of my life. It’s a thing that drives me to create, to push my own boundaries and to weather disappointment time and again. So when I watch a film that deals with that process, those struggles, that joyous and heartbreaking expression, it’s easy to see why I immediately identify. Not only that, but music in general, including scores and soundtracks, contributes hugely to making films memorable and impactful – a statement with which I think even the casual moviegoer would agree.

Recently I found myself reflecting on my taste in movies, and as I did so I thought about what it is that makes someone’s list of personal favorites personal. What are those films that are not merely good movies, but that say something about the person who choose them, the person who is moved or enriched by them? After all, that is at the heart of Raptor Reviews’ purpose to be transparent about how our own biases, experiences and preferences shape our conversation about film.

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